Using Structure to Solve Equations

Last November at the ATMNE 2017 fall conference, I attended a session where Gail Burrill highlighted some TI-Nspire documents that helped kids build concepts about expressions and equations. Sure, they’re targeted at middle level, but you use the tools that your students need, right, not where you wish they were?

Anyway, the one that really caught my eye was called “Using Structure to Solve Equations.” It was the perfect activity at the perfect time because my students were kind of struggling with solving (what I thought) were some fairly simple equations. Their struggle was about trying to remember the steps they knew someone had showed them rather than trying to reason their way through the equation. Just before learning about this activity, I had found myself using these strategies. For example, to help a student solve an equation like 3x + 8 = 44, I found myself covering up the 3x and asking the student, “What plus 8 equals 44?” When they came up with 36, I would follow up with, “So 3x must equal 36. What times 3 equals 36?” This approach helped several students – they stopped trying to remember and began to reason.

There were too many students who were still trying to remember, though. Their solutions to equations involving parentheses like 6(x – 4) – 7 = 5 or 8(x+ 9) + 2(x + 9) = 150 included classic distributive property mistakes. The “Using Structure …” activity was just like my covering up part of the equation and asking the question. But each student could work on their own equation and at their own pace. The equations were randomly generated so each kid had something different to work with. Working through the “Using Structure … ” activity helped kids to stop and think for a moment rather than employing a rote procedure.

In a follow-up to the activity, I asked kids to explain why 8(x+ 9) + 2(x + 9) = 150 could be thought of as 10(x + 9) = 150. My favorite response was because “8 bunches of (x + 9) and 2 bunches of (x + 9) makes 10 bunches of (x + 9).” From there, they saw it as trivial to say that x = 6. These were students who had previously struggled with solving equations like 3x + 8 = 44 because they couldn’t remember the procedure. After “Using Structure …” they didn’t have to remember, they just had to think!

1 Comment

Filed under BMTN, teaching, technology

One response to “Using Structure to Solve Equations

  1. Pingback: Mobile Algebra | rawsonmath

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